Tag Archives: vasectomy reversal

A vasectomy…in colors!

2019-02-19

A vasectomy in five colors…Blue/ the normal path of sperm from the production in the testicle, out the epididymis and into the vas deferens…Black/ the “grain of rice” opening on the scrotal skin over the vas defernes…Red/ the area of the transected vas and the segment removed…Green/ the lumen of the vas which is fulgurated or cauterized on either side of the transected vas…Yellow/the absorbable suture used to both occlude the vas and to seal off small vessels that may cause a delayed hematoma. No wonder that the chances of “growing back together” is less than one in two thousand! And why the dreaded complication of a egg sized knot “hematoma” is seldom seen after a vasectomy performed by Dr. McHugh.

Vasectomy Reversal: A “preoperative” predictor of better than average results?

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This is the isolated vas deferens at the time of a reversal. You can see the clips and a mass effect of the body’s attempt at healing the vasectomy “trauma.” This is called a sperm granuloma. Note the vas tubes going into the mass of healing and clips. Both sides are normal in appearance and normal caliber.

What a granuloma does is act as a “pop off” valve and releases some degree of pressure on the testicles. This in turn makes for less damage to the testicles and allows them to rebound sooner from a reversal. In many cases it will also improve the character of the fluid at the time of the reversal (which is also a favorable finding for the percentages of success).

So, if you are considering a reversal and in the shower examine yourself and feel a knot along the course of the vas tube above the testicle, this is a favorable sign and that you may have a better than average success rate for both patency  and pregnancy.

Just a small and interesting caveat for the couple thinking about reversing a vasectomy.

Take away? Success of vasectomy reversal not always related to the age of the patient. This is a common concern.

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Time to Sperm Appearance Can Be Predicted After Vasectomy Reversal

Urology – November 30, 2007 – Vol. 23 – No. 08

After vasectomy reversal, motile sperm observed intraoperatively at the testicular vas, undergoing vasovasostomy, and an obstructive interval of <=8 years predict shorter time to appearance of sperm in the ejaculate.

Article Reviewed: The Kinetics of the Return of Motile Sperm to the Ejaculate After Vasectomy Reversal. Yang G, Walsh TJ, et al: J Urol; 2007; 177 (June): 2272-2276.

The Kinetics of the Return of Motile Sperm to the Ejaculate After Vasectomy Reversal.

Yang G, Walsh TJ, et al:
J Urol; 2007; 177 (June): 2272-2276

Objective: To study the time to appearance of sperm in the ejaculate for men undergoing vasectomy reversal. Design: Retrospective chart review of men who had undergone bilateral vasovasostomy, bilateral epididymovasostomy, or a combination of vasovasostomy on 1 side and epididymovasostomy on the other. Participants/Methods: 150 men whose records included intraoperative findings with type of reversal performed, record of sperm presence or absence, and associated fluid findings from each testicular vas deferens. Results: Presence of motile sperm in vasa was associated with a shorter time to postoperative presence of sperm observed in the ejaculate: 95% of men with motile sperm in the intraoperative vasal specimen were observed to have sperm in the ejaculate by 6 months after vasectomy reversal compared to 76% of men without motile sperm in the intraoperative specimen (P =0.04). Features correlated with a shorter onset to the observation of sperm in the ejaculate within the first 3 months after vasectomy reversal included an obstructive interval of <=8 years and vasovasostomy rather than epididymovasostomy.

Patient age did not affect time to the observation of sperm in the ejaculate after vasectomy reversal.

Conclusions: Motile sperm observed intraoperatively at the testicular vas, undergoing vasovasostomy, and an obstructive interval of <=8 years predict shorter time to the appearance of sperm in the ejaculate after vasectomy reversal. Reviewer’s Comments: The similarity with previous studies by other investigators of time to sperm seen in the ejaculate, with an average of 3.2 months for vasovasostomy and 6.3 months for epididymovasostomy, provides excellent counseling information for couples considering vasectomy reversal. (Reviewer–Craig S. Niederberger, MD).

 

Predictive factors in sperm appearance after vasectomy reversal.

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Patient’s often ask, “What is your success rate?” The successful reversal is heavily influenced by the quality of the fluid at the testicular end at the time of the reversal and the time interval since the vasectomy. JM

Time to Sperm Appearance Can Be Predicted After Vasectomy Reversal

Urology – November 30, 2007 – Vol. 23 – No. 08

After vasectomy reversal, motile sperm observed intraoperatively at the testicular vas, undergoing vasovasostomy, and an obstructive interval of <=8 years predict shorter time to appearance of sperm in the ejaculate.

Article Reviewed: The Kinetics of the Return of Motile Sperm to the Ejaculate After Vasectomy Reversal. Yang G, Walsh TJ, et al: J Urol; 2007; 177 (June): 2272-2276.

The Kinetics of the Return of Motile Sperm to the Ejaculate After Vasectomy Reversal.

Yang G, Walsh TJ, et al:
J Urol; 2007; 177 (June): 2272-2276

Objective: To study the time to appearance of sperm in the ejaculate for men undergoing vasectomy reversal. Design: Retrospective chart review of men who had undergone bilateral vasovasostomy, bilateral epididymovasostomy, or a combination of vasovasostomy on 1 side and epididymovasostomy on the other. Participants/Methods: 150 men whose records included intraoperative findings with type of reversal performed, record of sperm presence or absence, and associated fluid findings from each testicular vas deferens.

Results: Presence of motile sperm in vasa was associated with a shorter time to postoperative presence of sperm observed in the ejaculate: 95% of men with motile sperm in the intraoperative vasal specimen were observed to have sperm in the ejaculate by 6 months after vasectomy reversal compared to 76% of men without motile sperm in the intraoperative specimen (P =0.04). Features correlated with a shorter onset to the observation of sperm in the ejaculate within the first 3 months after vasectomy reversal included an obstructive interval of <=8 years and vasovasostomy rather than epididymovasostomy. Patient age did not affect time to the observation of sperm in the ejaculate after vasectomy reversal.

Conclusions: Motile sperm observed intraoperatively at the testicular vas, undergoing vasovasostomy, and an obstructive interval of <=8 years predict shorter time to the appearance of sperm in the ejaculate after vasectomy reversal. Reviewer’s Comments: The similarity with previous studies by other investigators of time to sperm seen in the ejaculate, with an average of 3.2 months for vasovasostomy and 6.3 months for epididymovasostomy, provides excellent counseling information for couples considering vasectomy reversal. (Reviewer–Craig S. Niederberger, MD).

 

Vasectomy Reversal vs. IVF…which is better?

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Rev Hosp Clin Fac Med Sao Paulo. 2004 Oct;59(5):312-5. Epub 2004 Oct 29.

The best infertility treatment for vasectomized men: assisted reproduction or vasectomy reversal?

Abstract

In men with prior vasectomy, microsurgical reconstruction of the reproductive tract is more cost-effective than sperm retrieval with in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection if the obstructive interval is less than 15 years and no female fertility risk factors are present. If epididymal obstruction is detected or advanced female age is present, the decision to use either microsurgical reconstruction or sperm retrieval with in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection should be individualized. Sperm retrieval with in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection is preferred to surgical treatment when female factors requiring in vitro fertilization are present or when the chance for success with sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection exceeds the chance for success with surgical treatment.

Intimacy after vasectomy same as after a vasectomy reversal?

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From Vasectomy.com

Click here for article.

I usually tell patients wait one week after a vasectomy and three weeks after a vasectomy reversal before resuming sexual activity. Other than the fact that the reversal is a more  substantial procedure to recover from in time there is little difference in this particular regard. JM