Category Archives: McHugh Vasectomy Reversal

“Just the vas mam, just the vas!” McHugh Vasectomy/Reversal.

Vasectomies and Vas Reversals are the most common thing we do! Contact us for more information.

 

McHugh Vasectomy Reversal

Questions? We’ve got the answers!

Browse our site…particularly reversal cost, success rates and the various blog posts. Then arrange for a free consultation for additional information by using the contact form or by calling our office. Dr. McHugh will give you a call an afternoon that suits you.

Let us know how we can help!

Vasectomy Reversal Success!

Thank you so very much for sharing and thank you for allowing us to participate in such a beautiful journey.

Vasectomy Reversal? A patient journey.

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This a drawing done for me by a urological professor in Italy. I had asked him to draw his interpretation of pregnancy after a reversal.
  • It all starts with the decision to begin the journey that is a vasectomy reversal.
  • The procedure is not covered  by insurance.
  • Success can’t be guaranteed.
  • Once the procedure is performed, it takes the testicles about three months to begin producing sperm again.
  • If pregnancy occurs, it is usually six to eighteen months after the procedure.
  • A lot of things have to come in to place and in many ways a pregnancy is “miracle.”

Many times I have said to the vasectomy reversal couple that you have to begin with the procedure to start the clock. Then live your life… as this is a “patient journey.”

The McHugh “NO” Vasectomy

Will the Vasectomy Reversal procedure be like my Vasectomy?

A vasectomy takes about 15 minutes and I do them through a single “size of a grain of rice” opening.

A reversal, in my hands, takes about two hours and more commonly uses two incisions (3/4 inch on each side of the upper scrotum over the course of the vas deferens) and requires an operating microscope and microscopic suture.

I tell patients that it is a minor procedure, minimal blood loss or other complications, but it does take two hours to do. Bruising and some scrotal swelling is more common and there is a longer recovery period.

So…to the question…same structure (the vas deferens) different procedure.

Vasectomy? On this day in history Caesar was surprised. Don’t you be!

Rome-History-Julius-Caesar

As sole Roman ruler, Caesar launched ambitious programs of reform within the empire.

The most lasting of these was his establishment of the Julian calendar, which, with the exception of a slight modification and adjustment in the 16th century, remains in use today.

He also planned new imperial expansions in central Europe and to the east. In the midst of these vast designs, he was assassinated on March 15, 44 B.C., by a group of conspirators who believed that his death would lead to the restoration of the Roman Republic. However, the result of the “Ides of March” was to plunge Rome into a fresh round of civil wars, out of which Octavian, Caesar’s grand-nephew, would emerge as Augustus, the first Roman emperor, destroying the republic forever.

Click for free eBook on vasectomies by Dr. McHugh

Biggest determinate of a vasectomy reversal success?

The interval of time from the vasectomy.

Studies have shown success is related to the timing of the vasectomy which in turn is related to the ability of the testicles to begin producing sperm again in adequate numbers to achieve pregnancy.

Click on “Success Rates” in Menu to see how the interval of the vasectomy affects success.

A good reason why you shouldn’t have a vasectomy.

“It can be reversed, right?”

Well, yes. However, just because you can reverse a vasectomy, doesn’t mean that you will achieve pregnancy.

I have done several thousand vasectomies and  several hundred microscopic vasectomy reversals, so…here are some things to consider “before” you decide to have a vasectomy.

  • We tell patients that they should consider a vasectomy permanent and it is…and it isn’t. It can be reversed but it doing so may or may not result in pregnancy.
  • A reversal is not covered by insurance and costs range between $3,000- $15,000.
  • It is a surgery, there will be an incision on the scrotal area that has to heal and there may or may not be time out of work or cessation of physical activities for a few weeks.
  • If it works, i.e. the opening is reconnected and sperm begins to flow again in the ejaculate, there may not be numbers or quality enough to achieve pregnancy.
  • It is a patient endeavor as it takes 3-6 months for the testicles to begin producing sperm again normally and if pregnancy occurs it usually does between 6-18 months.
  • The longer the period between the vasectomy and the reversal, the lower the chances of success.  Click here for success rates based on the vasectomy interval.
  • One must visualize how it would feel to have gone through the surgery, the recovery, and the expense only to be on the side of the percentages where pregnancy does not occur.

So…you don’t want to have a vasectomy unless you are pretty darn sure you don’t want to have any more children. An option is to bank sperm before the vasectomy. This costs about $200 a year.

Conclusion: If you think there is any possibility that you might want to have more children do not have vasectomy. Depending on a reversal, even in the best scenario of surgeon and time interval from the vasectomy, is a risky endeavor.

On the flip side: If you have had a vasectomy, the chances of achieving pregnancy is essentially zero.  In this setting having a reversal is very reasonable as any chance at pregnancy with a reversal is better than no chance. This is the reasoning most couples have when deciding to pursue a reversal.

What is a sperm granuloma and why is it a good sign during a vasectomy reversal?

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The above picture shows the vas deferens isolated and one can see the clips and a small area of swelling of the vasectomy site. If there is swelling here, a sperm granuloma, then the potential for success is higher. A sperm granuloma is a “pop-off” valve of sorts and protects the sperm producing process of the testicle. 

The presence of a sperm granuloma explains why a patient 10 years out from a vasectomy might have a better chance than a patient 5 years out who doesn’t have one. This is a random occurrence and can’t be predicted who or who will not have a sperm granuloma. They are only beneficial for the vasectomy patient who is to have a reversal.